Why You Need to Get Involved in People’s Lives

The other day, one of the Deaf men at my church asked me if I could help him pick up something for his house that was down the road at another man’s house. I was busy the day he asked, but we scheduled a time a few days later. Honestly, I was not particularly excited about helping.

Pickup Truck

Photo courtesy of Marcelo Terraza on freeimages.com

I had just gotten off work and I wanted to go home and be lazy (I know, it’s selfish). I knew, however, that he needed a hand and I told him I would help. Anyways, everything was smooth, I picked him up, we got what he needed and I went home. You know what? I was really happy that I went; God used that situation as a teachable moment for me. I hope I can share some of the things I learned and that it will help you be more committed to serve.

Sometimes, as people who serve in church, we do not want to take the time to help out someone who needs it. I am not saying it is right, but we all have been there at one time or another. We make up all kinds of excuses like “I have something going on” or “I’m tired after work,” but the bottom line is that often we are not making helping people a priority.

We make up all kinds of excuses like “I have something going on” or “I’m tired after work,” but the bottom line is that often we are not making helping people a priority.

I am not saying to just let people use you. That is a good way to burn yourself out quickly. However, I am in favor of going the extra mile with people when there is a need. If you are the kind of person who is there 110% of the time, you might need a break and some boundaries. However, if you are like me, and sometimes find yourself reluctant to jump in and help, then I want to encourage you to get out and get involved with the people you are trying to reach and build real friendships with them. Make it a priority!

These are the lessons I learned, and I hope it encourages you to be more involved in people’s lives.

  1. It was helpful. All of us who are doing the best we can to minister to the Deaf hopefully have the kind of attitude where we want to help someone out when they’re in need. I do not mean in the sense that we are “helping the poor deaf people” (That is the wrong kind of attitude to have in Deaf ministry) but there was a guy who needed a ride and I was able to be there for him. In hindsight, it was time well spent.
  2. It was connecting. I did not know it at the time, but the guy whose house we were going to was a Deaf man who had visited our church in the past. What a great opportunity to reconnect!
  3. It was easy. It really did not take a lot of doing on my part. I picked him up, brought him to the other man’s house and brought him home. Nice and easy.
  4. It was short. I was (selfishly) thinking about what I could have been doing for me rather than for others. When all was said and done, I was gone for maybe an hour. Does being there for someone always take just a little bit of time? No, but it will most likely take less time than we think it will. Sometimes, we just need to move past the whole concept of it being “our time” and call it for what it is, God’s time.

Sometimes, we just need to move past the whole concept of it being “our time” and call it for what it is, God’s time.

In retrospect, it was an hour very well spent, and I believe it will be time well spent for you and your ministry. I hope this post makes you think “Who needs me?” and “Who can I help?” Maybe it’s the person who needs a ride, a visit, or just a friend to talk. Whatever it is, get out there and do it!

What do you do when you really are not in the mood to help someone out? Have you had any similar experiences? Share your thoughts here!

 

  • Great post, Cody.

    You know, it’s true in my life that I find it so easy to focus on my own comfort and priorities instead of on loving others. In fact, there are a number of great books out there (Margin, Boundaries, Do it Tomorrow) that teach valuable truths which, when combined with our natural laziness or selfishness can easily be used as excuses for failing to serve.

    Even ministry projects can be a reason why we are not there for people when they need us. It’s moments like this, though, that we have the greatest opportunity to bless and edify others, so let’s be open to them.

    We can’t always be there for everyone, but we have to care, and we have to make an effort to help when we can. That shows love.